Partition Settings

Specify the settings for the partition being created.

Size

You can resize and relocate the partition being created.

If you want to resize the partition:

  • Point the cursor at the partition border. If the cursor is pointed exactly at the partition border, it will change into two vertical lines with arrows on each side.
  • Hold down the left mouse button and drag the selected partition border to enlarge or reduce the partition size.

You can also set the size of the partition manually, by typing-in the desired partition size in the Partition Size field.

If you want to relocate the partition:

  • Point the cursor at the partition. The cursor will change into a crosshair.
  • Hold down the left mouse button and drag the partition until you get the necessary size of the Free space before and/or Free space after fields. You can also set the amount of unallocated space before or after the selected partition by manually typing-in the necessary value in the respective fields.

 

If you create one or more logical drives, the program will reserve some unallocated space for system needs in front of the created partition(s). If you create a primary partition or a primary partition together with a logical one then no unallocated space will be reserved for system needs. Later, you may convert this unallocated area into a primary disk if there is any need for it.

File System

Choose the file system type for partition being created and click Next to continue. Different partitions may have different type of file system.

You can either leave the partition unformatted, or choose between the following file system types:

  • FAT 16 native DOS system. Most operating systems recognize it. However, if your disk drive is more than 4 GB, it is not possible to format it in FAT16.
  • FAT 32 is an improved 32-bit version of the FAT file system that supports volumes up to 2 TB.
  • NTFS is a Windows NT, Windows 2000, Windows XP and Windows Vista native file system. Choose it if you use these operating systems. Note, that Windows 95/98/Me and DOS cannot access NTFS partitions.
  • Linux Ext2 is a Linux native file system. It is fast enough, but it is not a journaling file system.
  • Linux Ext3 – officially introduced with Red hat Linux version 7.2, Ext3 is a Linux journaling file system. It is forwards and backwards compatible with Linux Ext2. It has multiple journaling modes, as well as broad, cross platform compatibility in both 32-bit and 64-bit architectures.
  • Linux Swap is a swap partition for Linux. Choose it if you want to add more swap space using Linux
  • Linux ReiserFS is a journaling file system for Linux. Generally it is more reliable and faster than Ext2. Choose it for your Linux data partition.

Partition type

In order to use the space on a hard disk, it must be partitioned. Partitioning is the process of dividing the hard disk’s space into logical divisions. Each logical division may function as a separate disk with an assigned drive letter, its own file system, etc. Even if you do not intend to divide your hard disk into logical divisions, it must be partitioned so that the operating system knows that it is intended to be left in one piece.

Choose the type of partition to be created. You can define the new partition as primary or logical.

  • Primary – choose this parameter if you are planning to boot from this partition. Otherwise, it is better to create a new partition as a logical drive. You can have only four primary partitions per drive, or three primary partitions and one extended partition.Note: If you have several primary partitions, only one will be active at a time, the other primary partitions will be hidden and won’t be seen by the OS.
    • Mark the partition as active – an active partition is used for loading an operating system. Selecting Active for a partition without an installed operating system could prevent your computer from booting.
  • Logical – choose this parameter if you don’t intend to install and start an operating system from the partition. A logical drive is part of a physical disk drive that has been partitioned and allocated as an independent unit, but functions as a separate drive.Note: if you create one or more logical drives, the system will reserve some unallocated space for system needs in front of created partition(s). If you create a primary partition or a primary partition together with a logical one, then no unallocated space will be reserved for system needs. Later on, you may convert this unallocated area into a primary disk if there is any need for it.

Partition letter

Select a letter to be assigned to the partition being created from the drop-down list. If Auto is selected, the program assigns the first unused drive letter in alphabetical order.

Partition label

Partition label is a name, assigned to a partition so that you can easily recognize it. For example, one could be called System — a partition with an operating system, Program — an application partition, Data — a data partition, etc. Partition label is an optional attribute.